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Congress is now turning to work on FY 2015 funding bills, while waiting for the release of the Administration's budget request. This legislative work sets in motion a series of hearings on Capitol Hill this spring, where your input is critical. As you may know, Congress... [+] more
Congress is now turning to work on FY 2015 funding bills, while waiting for the release of the Administration's budget request. This legislative work sets in motion a series of hearings on Capitol Hill this spring, where your input is critical.

As you may know, Congress previously passed a spending package for FY 2014 this January that included all 12 appropriations bills rolled together. Passing by large margins, the legislation helps to restore previous cuts caused by the sequester. How the FY 2015 bills set funding for particular arts and culture programs remains unknown, but when the U.S. House of Representatives Appropriations Committee began consideration of the FY 2014 funding bill last time, they called for a 49% cut to the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). This would bring funding of the NEA down to $75 million, a level not seen since 1974!

The NEA funds grants in every congressional district in the country. A cut of this size, if considered again, would immediately end that ability to support the arts in all communities. The NEA supports funding in dance, design, folk & traditional arts, literature, local arts agencies, media arts, multidisciplinary, museums, music, musical theater, opera, presenting, theater, and visual arts.

Please take a few minutes to write to your Members of Congress to urge them to support the NEA in widening citizen access to the cultural, educational, and economic benefits of the arts, and advancing creativity and innovation in communities across the United States.

To learn more about the programs of the National Endowment for the Arts, click here.
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There are two priority areas for arts education advocacy at the federal level: strengthening the arts in the Elementary & Secondary Education Act (ESEA, most recently called the No Child Left Behind Act), and supporting the Arts in Education program at the U.S... [+] more
There are two priority areas for arts education advocacy at the federal level: strengthening the arts in the Elementary & Secondary Education Act (ESEA, most recently called the No Child Left Behind Act), and supporting the Arts in Education program at the U.S. Department of Education.

On June 11 and 12, the Senate education committee approved, by party-line vote, S.1094, the "Strengthening America's Schools Act" introduced by Chairman Tom Harkin. The legislation was based on a similar bill that Mr. Harkin introduced in the previous Congress which also passed out of committee but didn't make it to the Senate floor before that Congress adjourned. This Harkin bill includes a number of positive developments for arts education and is expected to be considered by the full Senate this Fall.

On June 19, the House Education & Workforce Committee approved, by a similar party-line vote, the "Student Success Act" (H.R. 5) introduced by Chairman John Kline (R-MN). This legislation was passed 221-207 on July 19. A Substitute Amendment, with several pro-arts provisions, proposed by Ranking Member George Miller (D-CA) was defeated 193-233 during full consideration by the House on July 19.

Further details on strengthening the arts in our nation's education policies, including legislative recommendations are online here.
 
Also, arts education funding is under threat in a House GOP budget proposal and in the Administration's FY 2014 budget request. The Arts in Education program has survived threats like these in previous years through support of grassroots advocates and support by Senate champions like Chairman Tom Harkin (D-IA) and Sen. Thad Cochran (R-MS). The Senate Appropriations Subcommittee FY 2014 legislation provides $27 million for the federal Arts in Education program which we hope will be enacted into law.
 
Please take a few minutes to write to your members of Congress and ask them to support strengthening arts education in federal policy.
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The nonprofit arts community, like other charitable sectors, relies on the generosity of individual donations from people of every income level who believe the public good is served by supporting charitable organizations. For nearly 100 years, the Charitable Deduction has... [+] more
Dear Tucson Arts Supporter, As a reminder, the City Council will be be meeting next Wednesday, April 23rd to vote on the City Manager's budget proposal to cut arts funding by 75% for FY 2014-2015, beginning on July 1, 2014.  We need to remind our Tucson elected... [+] more
Call to Action for Tucson Advocates
Dear Tucson Arts Supporter, Thank you for being part of Americans for the Arts and the Arts Action Fund's national advocacy network.  We write to you today with a local call to action happening in your own backyard.  Public funding for nonprofit arts... [+] more
At a time when global cultural exchange is of great value to United States interests, artists and nonprofit arts organizations have confronted uncertainty in gaining approval for foreign guest artist visa petitions due to lengthy and inconsistent processing times,... [+] more
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